Atsuji Seminar
Last Update 2018 May

Resilience Management: from Fukushima Disaster to Boiling Oceans and Northward Viral Spread [ Link ]

ISSS Journals - 61st Meeting - 2017 TU Wien, Vienna, Austria

We reviews the necessity of ‘resilience based on disaster management’ (Chroust, G., 2015). Firstly, it examines non-resilience, showing the current status of nuclear fuel debris, contaminated water and radioactive waste after the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster, since when radioactive contamination has damaged the local community and socio-economic systems. Secondly, it presents evidence of global spread of super-typhoons and unusual weather patterns, with the location of maximum typhoon intensity having moved northward by approximately 150-200 km compared to 1982, and at the same time expanded due to the ‘boiling ocean’ effect. Thirdly: it considers ir-resilience, ‘global ocean warming’ through the multiplier effects of hydrospheric and CO2 atmospheric warming. Finally: it discusses un-resilience, arising from the spread of infectious tropical diseases to the northern hemisphere caused by global ocean warming, as part of the irreversible environmental change caused by our artificial systems, which will increase the risk and crisis of disasters for all human beings. Re-consideration of our living systems is therefore necessary to create awareness of the ‘five functions of resilience management’ for all-round sustainability.

Keywords: disaster management, super typhoon, northward viral spread

Disaster Management for Boiling Globe by World's 441 Nuclear-heated Water [ Link ]

ISSS Journals - 59th Meeting - 2015 Berlin, Germany, Vol 1, No 1

The present research reviews, firstly outlines the ‘unstoppable’ nature of nuclear power generation as exemplified by the system lifecycle of ageing nuclear reactors, the decommissioning of reactors, and the nuclear waste disposal problem, which stakeholders find difficult to understand. Secondly, it highlights the sea-temperature rise in the northern hemisphere, specifically the North Pacific and North Atlantic, as a result of the thermal effluent water from nuclear power plants which is a product of today’s nuclear industry. Thirdly, it presents the hypothesis of the ‘Boiling Globe’ caused by this thermal effluent water, whereby the overheating of whole oceans compounds CO2–based atmospheric warming and accelerates the spread of infectious tropical diseases to the northern hemisphere. The research points to the unsustainability of this global boiling caused by the world’s 441 nuclear plants with an average lifespan of 30 years. The traumatic experience of the Fukushima disaster has become a ‘disaster anchor’ based on psychological and cultural aspects, comparable to the career anchors of Edgar Schein (1978), and is a cultural function forming the premise of decision-making. From the standpoint of Japan, which has experienced Fukushima and other frequent disasters, it is therefore important to make the world aware of the necessity of disaster management for our sustainable future.

Keywords: disaster management, resilience, global boiling, sustainability, disaster anchor

Unsafety: Systems Pathology of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe [ Link ]

ISSS Journals - 57th Meeting - 2013 HaiPhong, Vietnam

The magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that struck northeast Japan on March 11, 2011, were unavoidable natural disasters, but we consider the subsequent breakdown of the Fukushima nuclear power plants to be a catastrophe created not only by nuclear engineering systems but also by avoidable organizational errors – principally, neglect of nuclear safety issues without the necessary regulation both within the electric companies’ management and from the level of governmental policy making. The present paper reviews, firstly, a complete re-thinking of the non-rational locations of atomic power stations, secondly, an analysis of the irrational decision-making of safety management and nuclear policy, finally, a rational proposal concerning the fade-out of nuclear power throughout the world. These proposals are made with a view to obtain sustainable decision-making for the future, not simply in light of the supply and demand of electrical power, but also in consideration of environmental aspects including the social system and the ecosystem. This article is not criticism against the electric company and their government.

Keywords: organizational disaster, decision-making, limits of administration, sustainability

The Fukashima Catastrophe seen as a Malfunction of Organizational Systems:
Nuclear Fade-out and Hazard Maps for the World [ Link ][ PDF ]

General Systems Bulletin, Volume XXXXI, 2012, pp. 26-30.

The magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that struck northeast Japan on March 11, 2011, were unavoidable natural disasters, but we consider the subsequent breakdown of the Fukushima nuclear power plants to be a catastrophe created not only by nuclear engineering systems but also by avoidable the organizational errors – principally, safety management techniques without the necessary nuclear policy making considerations. The present article reviews, firstly, a complete re-thinking of the non-rational locations of atomic power stations throughout the world; secondly, an analysis of the irrational decision-making of nuclear policy and, finally, a rational proposal concerning the fade-out of nuclear power. These proposals are made on the basis of holistic, cybernetic “systems philosophy”.

Fukushima Nuclear Disaster 3.11: System Pathology of Social Organizations [ Link ]

ISSS Journals - 55th Meeting - 2011, Hull, UK

The magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami that struck northeast Japan on March 11, 2011, were unavoidable natural disasters, but we consider the subsequent breakdown of the Fukushima nuclear power plants to be a catastrophe created by avoidable human errors – an organizational disaster. We review the mistakes that have led up to the present nuclear crisis, and recommend several steps to avoid similar crises in the future. This speech considers the “Fukushima nuclear accident” as an organizational disaster. Furthermore, we discuss problems of the nuclear power plant system of Japan. These include issues of (i) the Fukushima nuclear station’s irrational location in a quake-prone and tsunami-prone area, (ii) the business ethics inherent to operating ageing reactors, (iv) the social responsibility required for organizational management, (v) non-rational governance of nuclear policy in extending the longevity of nuclear reactors, and (vi) the dynamics of system pathology in dealing with socio-biological hazards based on ageing technology, ambiguous management and fuzzy nuclear policy.

Keywords: organizational cybernetics, business ethics, social responsibility, system pathology, governance